A Commonwealth of the People: Popular Politics and Englands Long Social Revolution, 1066-1649

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The first privileged the state over local authorities, even though it was at the local level that most public services were delivered.


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The second implied that elites were only responsive to their own interests, and disregarded the concerns of their constituents. The third suggested that ordinary people were merely relevant as political actors on an incidental basis, during riots and rebellions, and disappeared into the background again as soon as the dust had settled. Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Skip to main content. Advertisement Hide. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Google Scholar. Some of the crucial works include Robert D. Peter Blickle ed. Christopher R.

The Rise of ‘The People’

Catherine F. More details about: University for the Creative Arts. University for the Creative Arts Help. A commonwealth of the people : popular politics and England's long social revolution, Show more Show less Author.

Rollison, David Physical description. Local notes. Includes bibliographical references and index. Reproduction available: Electronic reproduction. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest affiliated libraries. What came before: antecedent structures and emergent themes -- The formation of a constitutional landscape, c. Political culture Great Britain History.

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Popular culture Great Britain History. Populism Great Britain History. Community life Political aspects Great Britain History. Collective memory Political aspects Great Britain History.

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Social change Great Britain History. Great Britain Politics and government Great Britain Social conditions. This unusually bold and thought-provoking book offers a new interpretation of the course of English history. While it focuses on the period from the twelfth century to the seventeenth, and especially on the later middle ages of c. In a brief aside, Rollison presents Australia—itself a Commonwealth, and "the most "common" of the English settler societies" 9 —as the ultimate end of the English story. This bon mot is not uncharacteristic of a book which is full of fresh, bracing and interesting perspectives.

La légitimité implicite - The Commons in Medieval England - Éditions de la Sorbonne

Although it is nearly pages long, A Commonwealth of the People has the flavour of an essay: it takes a line, it touches widely on the issues of the present, it engages critically and extensively with secondary literature, and inevitably, and not really damagingly it takes a selective and assimilative approach to the historical record, pulling in what supports and extends its thesis and not worrying unduly about the rest. There are perhaps three main ingredients in Rollison's vision of the age of commonwealth: antagonism between a rising commonalty and a ruling elite of [End Page ] magnates and prelates; the emergence of the English vernacular—the common people's tongue—as the pre-eminent language of politics and public life; and the substitution of economic concerns for aristocratic ones in policy-making and public debate.

These three strands, he argues, came together in the master notion of "common weal" or "commonwealth", which was the rallying cry of the rising commons, an English neologism promoting the economic wellbeing of the mass of the population.

The use of "commonwealth" to mean political society—and even the state itself in the wake of Charles I's execution in —reflects the success of the commons in establishing the priority of their agenda: they may not have been the rulers until the s, but they had been forcing their way into the ruling circles from the fourteenth century or even the thirteenth, and keeping them happy was the principal aim of politicians from at least the Wars of the Roses.